Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 5th World Congress on Epigenetics and Chromosome Istanbul, Turkey.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Saleem Ali Banihani

Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan

Keynote: Effect of urate, an end product of purine nucleosides catabolism, on sperm function

Time : 10:00-11:00

Conference Series Epigenetics Congress 2018  International Conference Keynote Speaker Saleem Ali Banihani photo
Biography:

Saleem Ali Banihani has completed his PhD from Cleveland Clinic-Cleveland State University collaborative program in the field of Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Medicine. Currently, he is the Vice Dean of Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences at Jordan University of Science and Technology. He has published more than 33 papers in reputed journals, mainly in the field of Andrology.

Abstract:

Since beginning of the 60s, several studies have revealed the effect of urate, an end product of purine nucleosides catabolism, on semen quality and sperm function; though, this effect has not yet been collectively studied. Here, we systematically discuss the effect of urate on semen quality and sperm function and thus on sperm parameters (sperm motility, viability, morphology and sperm DNA oxidation). In conclusion, urate contributes to enhancing and protecting sperm viability, motility, morphology and sperm DNA damage, hence, contributes to protecting the ability of sperm to achieve fertilization. Mechanistically, this contribution is achieved primarily by counteracting the detrimental effect of nitrating agents and oxidizing agents, and enhancing the biochemical activity of certain enzymes in sperm. In contrast, high concentration of urate may induce negative effects on sperm parameters.

  • Special Session
Location: Akdeniz 2

Session Introduction

Samantha Gooden

Scotch Bonnet Ltd., Trinidad and Tobago

Title: Marketing innovation: A cure for cancer-A case study from South America

Time : 11:30-12:30

Speaker
Biography:

Samantha Gooden has completed her Graduation in Marketing and Entrepreneurship and Post-Graduation at Harvard University, USA in Sustainability Leadership. She is a serial entrepreneur and the CEO of Scotch Bonnet Ltd., Trinidad and Tobago with over 20 years of experience in marketing, communications, telecommunications and broadcasting throughout over 15 countries. Her background in Medical Technology forms that foundation for her as an author, speaker, lecturer and trainer who enjoys travelling.

Abstract:

The Guyana Cancer Foundation (GCF) operates in South America with free medical outreach in high-risk, low-income communities many of which are in the remote Hinterland areas. However, cancer is a taboo in this South American country, even those who are fighting the disease are unwilling to talk about the condition. In 2017 there was a huge boost in breast cancer awareness when the major telecommunications company partnered with GCF to raise funds and awareness. The month-long #PinktoberGuyana Campaign raised over GYD$4.7M and attracted 6,000+ to a single venue for the first and largest walk/run event of its kind in the country. The approach to marketing focused on social consciousness and social cohesion and unified the racially diverse nation around the cause thereby establishing this event within the national conversation and on the national calendar. Through collaboration, Scotch Bonnet, the marketing agency behind #PinktoberGuyana, created a platform for increased treatment opportunities and increased dialogue between NGOs, the private sector, the public sector, Oncology enthusiasts and others. Scotch Bonnet seeks to pool the knowledge from the 2018 event, which attracted 30,000 people and augment the learning with current trends, innovations and contemporary marketing methodology. It came up with a theme “Marketing innovation: A cure for cancer – A case study from South America”.

  • Epigenetics | Chromatin | Cancer Epigenetics
Location: Akdeniz 2

Session Introduction

Indraneel (Neel) Mittra

Tata Memorial Centre, India

Title: Chromatin outside the cell: A new paradigm in biology

Time : 12:30-13:00

Speaker
Biography:

Indraneel (Neel) Mittra is Ernest Borges Chair in Translational Research and Professor Emeritus Department of Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai. He has obtained his Medical Degree from University of Delhi, is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and holds a PhD degree from University of London. He has completed his Post-doctoral research with Dr. Renato Dulbecco, Nobel Laureate, at the Imperial Cancer Research Laboratories in London. His current research interests are in the area of biology of extracellular nucleic acids and their role in ageing, inflammation, degenerative disorders and initiation and meta-statis of cancer. He has published in high impact journals such as Nature, Cell, Lancet and Br Med J. He is a Fellow of the Indian National Science Academy and Indian Academy of Sciences.

Abstract:

109-1012 cells die in the adult human body daily and much of the fragmented chromosomes in the form of cell-free chromatin (cfCh) are released into the extracellular compartment of the body, including into the circulation. Our research has shown that cfCh have extraordinary and diverse local and systemic damaging effects on host cells that may form the basis of many human maladies. cfCh can freely enter into healthy cells, accumulate in their nuclei, trigger a DNA damage repair response and integrate into their genomes by an unique mechanism. Genomic integration of cfCh leads to dsDNA breaks, inflammation, chromosomal instability, senescence and apoptosis of recipient cells. These pathologies are integral to ageing and ageing-related disorders such as cardio-vascular diseases, diabetes, stroke and neurodegenerative disorders. cfCh induced inflammation and DNA damage may play a key role in infection and sepsis as well as autoimmune disorders and cancer. cfCh isolated from cancer patients can readily transform NIH3T3 cells by inducing DNA damage, inflammation and chromosomal instability and up-regulating multiple hallmarks of cancer. The transformed cells form tumors when inoculated into immune-deficient mice. Cell-free DNA isolated from sera of cancer patients are inactive, suggesting epigenetic mechanisms underlying the oncogenic process. When cancer cells are injected  intravenously into mice, they die rapidly upon reaching distant organs to release cfCh particles which localize in nuclei of target cells to induce dsDNA breaks, inflammatory cytokines and up-regulating cancer hallmarks. Fluorescent phosphorylated H2AX signals and those of NFκB and cancer hallmarks are frequently activated simultaneously in the same target cells suggesting that such cells have a high propensity for oncogenic transformation. These findings suggest that cfCh from dying cancer cells can transform cells of the microenvironment both locally and in distant organs providing a novel mechanism of tumor invasion and metastasis.

Emine Kandemis

Bahçeşehir University, Turkey

Title: Long non coding RNAs effect cancer cell invasion by epigenetic alterations

Time : 14:00-14:30

Speaker
Biography:

Emine Kandemiş has completed her B.Sc. at Haliç University, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and had her Master’s and PhD degrees at Dokuz Eylül University, Department of Medical Biology and Genetics. He is a Faculty Member at Bahçeşehir University, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics since 2017. His research mainly focuses on cancer, stem cells and lncRNAs.

Abstract:

Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) is a subgroup of non-coding RNAs and lncRNAs can regulate gene expression. LncRNAs have different lengths (≥200 bp). There is limited information about these lncRNAs. Recent studies showed that they play crucial roles during carcinogenesis. LncRNAs regulate gene expression by Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) in various biological processes, such as cell motility, cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell invasion. PRC2 is composed of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), suppressor of zetse 12 (SUZ12) and embryonic ectoderm development (Eed) and catalyzes H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3). EZH2 is the catalytic component of PRC2 and is frequently overexpressed in human cancers. Some lncRNAs, such as MALAT1, HOTAIR, TUG1, LINC01133 epigenetically regulate gene expression through binding to PRC2 during carcinogenesis. MALAT1 can bind with EZH2 and this interaction promotes gastric cancer cellular migration and invasion. Also MALAT1 promotes osteosarcoma metastasis through interacting with EZH2. HOTAIR interacts with PRC2 and induces breast cancer cell invasion. On the other hand TUG1 could affect cell proliferation by binding to PRC2 in human non-small cell lung cancer and TUG1 positively correlated with gastric cancer invasion. Knockdown of LINC01133 in non-small cell lung cancer cells decreased cell migration and invasion by interacting with PRC2. Carcinogenesis is a very complex phenomenon and is highly affected by epigenetic modifications. Cell invasion is the most common process for cancer development. It is reported that lncRNAs can interact with PRC2 and they can induce cell invasion through epigenetic alterations. We suggest that these lncRNAs can be used for inhibition of cancer cell invasion and thus, they can provide new alternatives to cancer treatment.

Berna Demircan

Istanbul Medeniyet University, Turkey

Title: Epigenetic alterations in glioma

Time : 14:30-15:00

Speaker
Biography:

Berna Demircan has received her PhD Degree from Medical Biochemistry, Ataturk University, Turkey. She has completed her Postdoctoral training in Florida University and New York Columbia University-Cancer Research Center, USA. Her current research interest includes cancer epigenetics, particularly DNA methylation and microRNAs. She has publications and book chapters on her research field. Currently, she has been working as an Associate Professor at Istanbul Medeniyet University in Istanbul, Turkey.

Abstract:

Epigenetic changes play an important role in the pathogenesis of gliomas and have the potential to become clinically useful biomarkers. The aim of our study was the evaluation of the profile of promoter methylation of RASSF1, MGMT, PTEN and SOCS3 genes based on their expected diagnostic and/or prognostic value. Pyrosequencing (PSQ) was used to assess the methylation status of RASSF1A, MGMT, PTEN and SOCS3 genes in a subset of 40 glioma tumors of different grades. RASSF1A was most frequently methylated (p<0.05), whereas SOCS3 was methylated to a lesser extent. The methylation status of RASSF1 was not correlated with tumor grade of patients. There were no statistically significant differences between the healthy control and patients with respect to promoter methylation levels of MGMT and PTEN. Our results suggested that RASSF1A gene might serve as an epigenetic biomarker in glioma. It also gives us an insight for future glioma medical therapy with a demethylating agent.

Speaker
Biography:

Ol’ha O Brovarets has received her BSc (2008) and MSs (2009) degrees with honors in Physics at the Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Ukraine. In 2011 year she defended her PhD thesis and in 2015, DrSci thesis. She has obtained a Senior Researcher Academic Title in 2013. She is currently working as a Professor at the Department of Pharmacology, Bogomolets National Medical University. She has received Scopus Award Ukraine 2016 and Leader of the Science in Ukraine Web of Science Award 2016. She has published more than 120 scientific works.

 

Abstract:

For the first time we have explored the structural diversity of the biologically-important guanine∙cytosine (G∙C) DNA base pairs - reverse Watson-Crick G*∙C*(rWC), Hoogsteen G*O6∙C*(H) and reverse Hoogsteen G*O6·C*(rH) mispairs using quantum-mechanical calculations at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of QM theory in the continuum with ε=1 under normal conditions in combination with Bader's Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM). It was theoretically demonstrated that these rWC/H/rH base mispairs possess unique ability to perform tautomeric transition into the base pairs with wobble (w) geometry and vice versa through the intramolecular single proton transfer along the intermolecular H-bonds accompanied with the mutual shifting of the bases inside the base pair into the minor or major DNA grooves. We have established that rWC/H/rH↔w transitions lead both to the structural, so to the tautomeric changes of the base pairs. In each case these structurally-tautomeric transitions occur through two different pathways via the two transitions states (TSs) as tight G+∙C- ion pairs. In the cases of the reverse Watson-Crick G*∙C*(rWC) and Hoogsteen G*O6∙C*(H) base mispairs this tautomeric wobbling is preceded by the sequential double proton transfer along the intermolecular H-bonds. Moreover, formed wobble base mispairs are able to convert into their trans-conformers due to the rotation of the non-bonded OH or NH groups. All of the investigated G∙C DNA base pairs are tightly connected with each other through the number of reaction pathways due to the SPT or DPT, rWC/H/rH↔w or cys↔trans transitions.

Mazhar Iqbal

Biochemy, Pakistan

Title: Human migration and genetics

Time : 15:30-16:00

Speaker
Biography:

Mazhar Iqbal is a Lecturer of Biology since 20 years. He is delivering the lectures to Pre University students associated with Preston University and Greenwich University, Pakistan. He is also the author of the book Decode Your Brain, published by Amazon and enrolled as Research Scholar at Greenwich University, Pakistan.

Abstract:

Humans are migrating right from their origin. Human’s apparent features like skin, hair color, blood hemoglobin, and some other characteristics remained a hallmark for them before the continental drift. Climatic adaptations are challenging for humans from one part of the world to the other. An Asian woman in the mid-nineteenth century was capable to give birth to at least 18 to 20 children in her entire reproductive cycle. The third generations of those mothers are restricted to one child or nil. This alarming situation is more apparent in those, who moved to Europe from Asia. There is much room to investigate genetically that what made today's females not to have children. What jumping genes are involved in the current selection pressures? What evolutionary mutations took place in the neurons that females are denying their basic instinct.